2019-07-23

Riga Grand Prix 2019

The next tournament of the Fide Grand Prix is taking place in Latvia from 12th to 24th of July. Its a 16 players knockout in 2 games.
Time control: 90 minutes/40 moves + 30 min to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment from move 1.
In case of a tie two games 25+10 rapid then two 10+10 followed by two 5+3 and an Armageddon if needed.

Official site
The official broadcast is available on worldchess.com.

Schedule in UTC:
Round 1 / Game 1    Jul 12, 2019    12:00 
Round 1 / Game 2    Jul 13, 2019    12:00 

Jul 14, 2019 Tiebreaks starting at 12:00

Round 1/4 final / Game 1    Jul 15, 2019    12:00 
Round 1/4 final / Game 2    Jul 16, 2019    12:00 

Jul 17, 2019 Tiebreaks starting at 12:00

Round 1/2 final / Game 1    Jul 18, 2019    12:00 
Round 1/2 final / Game 2    Jul 19, 2019    12:00

Jul 20, 2019 Tiebreaks starting at 12:00

Jul 21 - Rest day

Round Final / Game 1    Jul 22, 2019    12:00 
Round Final / Game 2    Jul 23, 2019    12:00 

Jul 24, 2019 Tiebreaks starting at 12:00

Watch the games of the Riga Grand Prix 2019 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2019-07-19

Czech Open 2019

The Czech Open 2019 held in Pardubice Czech Republic between 19th and 27th July 2019.
Time control: 90 min. for 40 moves, then 30 min. to the end of the game, and 30-sec. increment starting from move one.

Official site

Schedule in UTC:

Round 1    Jul 19, 2019    13:20 
Round 2    Jul 20, 2019    13:20 
Round 3    Jul 21, 2019    13:20 
Round 4    Jul 22, 2019    13:20 
Round 5    Jul 23, 2019    13:20 
Round 6    Jul 24, 2019    13:20 
Round 7    Jul 25, 2019    13:20 
Round 8    Jul 26, 2019    13:20 
Round 9    Jul 27, 2019    13:20

Watch the games of the Czech Open 2019 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

US Chess Women’s Program Grant Recipients Announced

US Chess Women’s Program Grant Recipients Announced
11 programs from across the United States will share in grant funds intended to
advance the cause of women’s chess






CROSSVILLE, TN: US Chess is delighted to announce the recipients of the US Chess Women’s Program Grant, funded by a generous gift in partnership with the Saint Louis Chess Club.


The extremely competitive selection process attracted 40 applicants from across the United States. Ultimately, 11 programs have been granted funds by a committee that included US Chess Women’s Program Director Jennifer Shahade, who said: “I was blown away by the quality of the applications. There are so many incredible organizers and affiliates across the country who are hungry to do more to bring girls and women into the game, and the dollars donated will have a multiplying effect when accounting for the passion and drive behind the projects.”



Rex Sinquefield, who founded the Saint Louis Chess Club with Dr. Jeanne Sinquefield, told US Chess, “It's great to see the commitment and passion organizers all over the country have for female empowerment through chess. Jeanne and I are proud to be a part of a movement toward a more balanced gender ratio in chess and expect many of the girls who benefit from this grant program to be watching, and one day playing in a top event like the Cairns’ Cup.”



Award recipients are listed below. Look for updates as projects kick off on uschess.org/clo.

    Girls to Grandmasters (G2GM), a New York non-profit founded by Kastern McVay and Nicole Maffeo, will host a series of workshops in Central Park Chess & Checkers House designed to both teach chess skills and intentionally build girls' self-esteem via a confidence coach.
    Ranae Bartlett, the Executive Director of the Madison City Chess League, will further her efforts to bring more girls into the game in Madison, Alabama, culminating with a trip to the 2020 KCF All-Girls Nationals in Chicago.
    Elizabeth Shaughnessy, the director of the Berkeley Chess School, received a grant for “Queens Rule!” a pilot program funding afterschool chess clubs for girls in three poorly resourced Title I schools in the Bay Area.
    Latasha Taste-Walker, the director of Development at Communities in Schools of the Midlands in South Carolina, will use the funds to bring more girls to after-school chess clubs for at-risk-youth.
    The Chess and Science Festival and All Female tournament, an event that showcases the links between chess and STEM, is organized by three-time US Women’s Champ WGM Anjelina Belakovskaia and will be held in Tucson, Arizona on Nov 24, 2019. 
    The Chess Moms Can Play Chess, Too in Hunter, North Carolina (October 9th) will coach moms to play competitive chess and will include a US Chess tournament game requirement.

    The Florida State Chess Championship (date TBD) will host a girls’ and women’s event organized by Krista Alton and Kevin Pryor on behalf of the Florida Chess Association.
    The Chess-in-the-Schools All-Girls Tournament will host a free girls’ event in March 2020 that has attracted hundreds of girls in previous editions.
    Jay Stallings of the California Chess Youth League received a grant for a quartet of festive educational events centering on female empowerment and mentorship.
    Robin Ramson, director of the non-profit “Chess Girls DC” earned a grant that will help girls with limited resources to attend and play in her popular event, the third annual Girls and Women Regional Chess Tournament (October 19, 2019).
    The Philadelphia Chess Society will organize local Girls Club Rooms similar to our National Event rooms, as well as send a bus full of girls to the 2020 KCF All-Girls nationals, under the banner of the “Philadelphia Girls Chess Society.”



Watch the games of the US Championships - Juniors, Girls, Seniors with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2019-07-17

Turkish Isbank Super League 2019

The Turkish Isbank Super League 2019 is a team tournament held in Ankara, Turkey between 17th and 28th July 2019.
Time control: 90 min. for 40 moves, and 30 min. to the end of the game with a 30-second increment from move 1.

Official site

Schedule in UTC:

Round 1    Jul 17, 2019    14:00   
Round 2    Jul 18, 2019    12:00   
Round 3    Jul 19, 2019    12:00   
Round 4    Jul 20, 2019    12:00   
Round 5    Jul 21, 2019    07:00   
Round 6    Jul 21, 2019    14:00   
Round 7    Jul 23, 2019    12:00   
Round 8    Jul 23, 2019    21:00   
Round 9    Jul 25, 2019    07:00   
Round 10    Jul 25, 2019    14:00   
Round 11    Jul 25, 2019    21:00   
Round 12    Jul 27, 2019    12:00   
Round 13    Jul 28, 2019    07:00

Watch the games of the Turkish Isbank Super League 2019 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2019 U.S. Junior, Girls' Junior and Senior Championship Recap – Round 5


by Josh Friedel
All three sections had their share of interesting games, though the Juniors were definitely the most bloodthirsty. In a day of all decisive results, Nicolas Checa maintained his lead by winning a nice game. Awonder Liang and Joshua Sheng also won, and remain tied for 2nd just half a point back. Carissa Yip and Rochelle Yu both drew their games, and thus maintain their positions of clear first and 2nd respectively. Alex Goldin won again, allowing him to tie for first with Alex Shabalov, who failed to convert a promising position against Larry Christiansen.  Let’s take a look at what happened.
 
U.S. Junior Championship

Hans Niemann got a difficult opening position against Awonder Liang, then found himself with a weak king after his fianchettoed kindside bishop got traded. Awonder delivered checkmate soon after, moving him up to an impressive four out of five.  
Jennifer Yu’s woes continued today, as she lost a rather one-sided game to Atulya Vaidya. To his credit, Atulya played quite well and capped off his first win of the tournament in devastating fashion. Craig Hilby and Nicolas Checa got involved in a highly theoretical duel in a Bb4+ Nbd2 Catalan. Checa seemed to know the line better, and after Craig prematurely captured a rook on a8 instead of continuing his initiative, Black seemed to have an excellent position. Nico converted his edge in accurate fashion.  
Andrew Tang had Brandon Jacobson under pressure for a long time, but Brandon was defending admirably. He ended up losing in a tricky king and pawn ending, however, which allowed Andrew to take his first point of the tournament. Joshua Sheng won a wild game against John Burke, one in which the commentators and players alike were highly unsure of what went on. In the end, Joshua staved off pressure to his king, then zoomed in on his opponent’s to finish off a nice victory.
 
Read the full recap >
Joshua Sheng outcalculated John Burke in a wild game, allowing him to stay tied for 2nd

U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship

The girls had one of their more peaceful days of the tournament, but you wouldn’t know it by the positions they got. Agata Bykovtsev sacrificed a piece against Maggie Feng, and seemed to get very promising compensation. Maggie managed to navigate towards an ending where she held Black to a draw.  
Carissa Yip wandered her king into the center in a complex ending against Thalia Cervantes.  Thalia could find nothing better than giving a perpetual, however, in a position that looked completely crazy. Emily Nguyen got a favorable isolated pawn position out of the opening against Veronika Zilajeva, then won a pawn and traded into an endgame. While she was disappointed with her conversion, she never really let her opponent back into the game, and in the end got a smooth victory.  
Ruiyang Yan had an extra piece against Martha Samadashvili’s pawns, and the piece proved to be stronger in this game. While the conversion was never easy, a late game slip by Martha allowed her to win more easily. Rachael Li, with 0/4, played against the 4/4 Rochelle Wu this round. You wouldn’t know it by her play, however, as she absolutely took it to the tournament leader. In the end, however, Rochelle found a way to sac two exchanges to complicate the game. The players agreed to a draw in a position that could have really gone either way.  
 
Rochelle Wu looked nervous today, but only gave up half a point, allowing her to stay ahead

U.S. Senior Championship

The seniors played a lot of sharp games, but only some ended in a decisive result. Alex Yermolinsky had what looked like an unpleasant position against Jaan Ehlvest’s King’s Indian, but the players agreed to a draw at move 30 in a position with much life left in it. Maxim Dlugy played a sharp variation of the London against Igor Novikov, and played an interesting queen sacrifice that led to a promising position. Igor navigated the complexities better, however, and ended up raking in his first full point.  
Gregory Kaidanov got a dominating center against Joel Benjamin, and it looked as if he might score his first win. Joel found some nice defensive resources, however, and they agreed to a draw in an ending where neither could make progress. Alex Goldin had a dubious-looking opening position against Alex Fishbein, but Fishbein made a few missteps, which allowed Goldin to trade into an endgame up two pawns. As was the case yesterday, he made no mistakes in the conversion.  
Alex Shabalov and Larry Christiansen are both known for their attacking play, and their game did not disappoint. After Larry C surprised Shabba in the opening, Alex navigated his way into a very strong attack. Larry showed his defensive prowess, however, and was able to finagle a draw after a sharp tussle.

Read the full recap >
Alex Shabalov put Larry Christiansen under heavy pressure, but in the end let him escape
Round six starts tomorrow at 1pm. Tune in at 12:50pm central time for live commentary by GMs Robert Hess, Jesse Kraai, and WGM Tatev Abrahamyan.
Watch all the action LIVE at
USChessChamps.com

Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions

4657 Maryland Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63108 | (314) 361.CHESS (2437)
The Saint Louis Chess Club acknowledges Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, whose generous support makes our tournaments possible.

The STLCC and WCHOF admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved.


Watch the games of the US Championships - Juniors, Girls, Seniors with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2019-07-16

Tal Memorial Rapid 2019

Tal Memorial Rapid 2019 is an 11 rounds rapid tournament 15+5, held in Riga, Latvia on July 16th and 17th 2019.
Time control: the players have 15 minutes for a game with 5 seconds increment from move 1.

Official site

Schedule in UTC:
Round 1    Jul 16, 2019    10:00   
Round 2    Jul 16, 2019    11:00   
Round 3    Jul 16, 2019    12:00   
Round 4    Jul 16, 2019    13:00   
Round 5    Jul 16, 2019    14:00   
Round 6    Jul 16, 2019    15:00   
Round 7    Jul 17, 2019    08:00   
Round 8    Jul 17, 2019    09:00   
Round 9    Jul 17, 2019    10:00   
Round 10    Jul 17, 2019    11:00   
Round 11    Jul 17, 2019    12:00   
 .

Watch the games of the Tal Memorial Rapid 2019 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.


Mikhail Tal 1982.jpg

The tournament has been held in Moscow annually since 2006 to honour the memory of the Soviet Latvian chess Grandmaster Mikhail Tal (1936 –1992), the eighth world chess champion (from 1960 to 1961).

You can see games from previous issues of the tournament with computer analysis at ChessBomb:
Mikhail Tal Blitz Cup 2018
Tal Memorial Rapid 2018 (Winner Vishwanathan Anand)
Tal Memorial Rapid 2017 (Winner Onischuk Vladimir)
Tal Memorial Blitz 2017 (Winner Shirov Alexei))
Tal Memorial 2016 (Winner Ian Nepomniachtchi)
Tal Memorial Blitz 2016
Tal Memorial Blitz 2014 (Winner Shakhriyar Mamedyarov)


2019 U.S. Junior, Girls' Junior and Senior Championship Recap – Round 4


by Josh Friedel
Today’s round had a lot of action in all sections. Nicolas Checa took the lead with a fine victory over Andrew Tang. Both Rochelle Wu and Carissa Yip won topsy-turvy games, and seem to be running away in the Girls’ tournament with 4/4 and 3.5/4 respectively. Alex Shabalov survived a lot of strong pressure from Joel Benjamin, and maintains a half point lead in the Seniors over Larry Christiansen and Alex Goldin. Let’s break down what happened in each event.
U.S. Junior Championship

The first game completed in the Junior was a heartbreaking one. IM Craig Hilby got his moves confused and had to resign after hanging a bishop against IM Hans Niemann. Such blunders occur now and then, even by super strong players, but they always leave the players and viewers in shock.
Atulya Vaidya has been having a rough event, and today he played solidly against Joshua Sheng, hoovering off most of the pieces in short order. They agreed to a draw in a balanced rook endgame. The US Women’s Champion continued to struggle, as Jennifer Yu got a cramped position as Black against Brandon Jacobson. Brandon finished off the game in resounding fashion by sacrificing a knight on f6 and taking advantage of Black’s lack of coordination.

Awonder Liang shook off yesterday’s loss by taking risks and pitching his queenside as Black against John Burke.  His risk paid off handsomely, and he crashed through by giving his queen for two rooks and a vicious 1st rank attack, winning the game in short order. Lastly, Nicolas Checa found an initiative against Andrew Tang, and eventually hunted down the Black king.  This win put Nicolas in clear first place with 3.5/4.
Read the full recap >
Nicolas Checa played a very nice game today, and is currently in the clear lead with 3.5/4

U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship
 
“I hated it,” Rochelle Wu said about her position after the game. She had severe positional problems against Ruiyang Yan, who was playing an excellent game and dominating the entire board. Similar to previous rounds, however, Rochelle proved her resourcefulness. She opened the game by pitching a couple pawns, then found a nice tactical resource which won a rook out of the blue, forcing Yan to resign. Rochelle is an incredible 4-0, but Carissa moved to 3.5 today by beating Rachael Li as Black. The game was anything but clear, and the 9-year-old definitely had her chances, but in the end Carissa’s pressure proved to be too great.
Thalia Cervantes and Emily Nguyen played a game that had a lot of potential for sharp play, but none of it really materialized. The players agreed to a draw after a lot of pieces came off in a locked position. Agata Bykovstev seemed to have some pressure against Martha Samadashvili, but she soon found herself in trouble when she traded her queen for two rooks. Martha took full advantage of White’s weak king position, and eventually reeled in the full point in a queen vs. rook endgame.
In the final game of the day, Veronika Zilajeva had a thrilling game against Maggie Feng.  Maggie’s king ran up the board, and for a while it was unclear who was better. Unfortunately for Feng, she captured a pawn on a5 at the wrong moment, and allowed Veronika to deliver checkmate. Veronika found it, and thus won her first game of the tournament.

Read the full recap >
Veronika Zilajeva and Maggie Feng had quite a battle this round

U.S. Senior Championship

Larry Christiansen and Alex Fishbein played an interesting Nimzo Indian, and the position became extremely locked after an f5-f4 push. Neither side could find a way to break through, and they agreed to a draw on move 31.  

Igor Novikov and Gregory also drew a solid game. Neither side made errors in a drawish line, and they agreed to a draw in a knight endgame. Jaan Ehlvest put a lot of pressure on Maxim Dlugy’s weak king. While Max found a lot of tricks, as he has in previous rounds, eventually Jaan extinguished all of them and forced a win in a queen endgame. Joel Benjamin and Alex Shabalov had an incredible battle, and for most of the game Joel was clearly in charge. Shabba put all of his resourcefulness on display to make things complicated, however, and Joel finally acquiesced to a draw in a rook endgame.
Finally, Alex Goldin had an instructive positional win against Alex Yermolinsky.  He transitioned from a hanging pawns position to a rook endgame up a pawn. As Goldin commented after the game, the “Russian School” helps in such positions, and he converted it with great accuracy.  
Alex Goldin showed great technique in a rook endgame against Alex Yermolinsky
Round five starts today at 1pm. Tune in at 12:50pm central time for live commentary by GMs Robert Hess, Jesse Kraai, and WGM Tatev Abrahamyan.
Watch all the action LIVE at
USChessChamps.com

Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions

4657 Maryland Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63108 | (314) 361.CHESS (2437)
The Saint Louis Chess Club acknowledges Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, whose generous support makes our tournaments possible.

The STLCC and WCHOF admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved.


Watch the games of the US Championships - Juniors, Girls, Seniors with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.