2018-07-20

ChessBomb congratulates all chess friends on the International Chess Day.

The story of the celebration is related to the founding of the International Federation of Chess Federation (FIDE) during the VIII Summer Olympics in 1924 in Paris. 

The FIDE motto "Genus una sumus" - "We are all family," reminds us today that the ancient game is beyond all age, racial and political differences!

Yaroslav the Wise Open 2018

The Yaroslav the Wise Open is a 9-round Swiss tournament taking place from 20-28 July 2018 in Yaroslavl, Russia. Players receive 90 minutes for the entire game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one.

Official site

Schedule: UTC
Round 1    Jul 20, 2018    13:00 
Round 2    Jul 21, 2018    07:00 
Round 3    Jul 22, 2018    07:00 
Round 4    Jul 23, 2018    07:00 
Round 5    Jul 24, 2018    07:00 
Round 6    Jul 25, 2018    07:00 
Round 7    Jul 26, 2018    07:00 
Round 8    Jul 27, 2018    07:00 
Round 9    Jul 28, 2018    07:00

Watch the games of the Yaroslav the Wise Open 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

Hungarian Rapid 2018

The Hungarian Rapid Championship is a 13-round Swiss tournament taking place in Ajka,  Hungary between 20 and 22 July 2018. Players receive 20 minutes for the entire game, plus a 5-second increment starting from move one.

Official site

Schedule: (UTC)
Round 1    Jul 20, 2018    12:00 
Round 2    Jul 20, 2018    13:00 
Round 3    Jul 20, 2018    14:00 
Round 4    Jul 20, 2018    15:00 
Round 5    Jul 20, 2018    16:00 
Round 6    Jul 21, 2018    07:00 
Round 7    Jul 21, 2018    08:00 
Round 8    Jul 21, 2018    09:00 
Round 9    Jul 21, 2018    10:00 
Round 10    Jul 21, 2018    11:00 
Round 11    Jul 22, 2018    07:00 
Round 12    Jul 22, 2018    08:00 
Round 13    Jul 22, 2018    09:00


Watch the games of the Hungarian Rapid 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

Czech Open Tournaments 2018

The Czech Open and Czech Open - Rapid are held in the Tipsport Arena in Pardubice as part of the massive International Chess and Games Festival between 18 and 28 July 2018.

Official site

The Czech Open - Rapid is a 9-round Swiss tournament. Players receive 15 minutes for the entire game, plus a 10-second increment starting from move one.
Nurgyul Salimova won the Czech Open - Rapid 2018! Olexiy Taranik is second and Tsvetan Stoyanov - third! Congratilatoins!

Watch the games of the Czech Open Rapid 2018 with computer analysis on ChessBomb.


The Czech Open is a 9-round Swiss tournament. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one.

Schedule: (UTC)
Round 1    Jul 20, 2018    13:00 
Round 2    Jul 21, 2018    13:00 
Round 3    Jul 22, 2018    13:00 
Round 4    Jul 23, 2018    13:00 
Round 5    Jul 24, 2018    13:00 
Round 6    Jul 25, 2018    13:00 
Round 7    Jul 26, 2018    13:00 
Round 8    Jul 27, 2018    13:00 
Round 9    Jul 28, 2018    13:00

Watch the games of the Czech Open 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.


U.S. Junior Championships - Round 7 Recap



by Vanessa West

The 6-way tie for 1st in the Junior section disappeared as quickly as it appeared—with Awonder Liang emerging as the sole leader. In the Girls section, most of the leaders won, allowing Carissa Yip to maintain her half point edge.

Read the full recap >
U.S. Junior Championship

Awonder Liang played a skillful game to defeat co-leader Alex Bian. Liang played in a dynamic style, replying to Bian’s attack on his knight on c4 with a stronger counter-threat. At the end of the tactical sequence that arose, Liang obtained great control of the dark squares and an extra pawn, which he swiftly guided to victory.
Ruifeng Li earned his first victory of the championship against John Burke. He began the game in his usual unorthodox style with the Hippopotamus Defense. In the middlegame, Burke obtained an edge by creating pressure and gaining space on the queenside. However, he missed a key opportunity to create a protected passed pawn with 33. c6. Later, Burke sacrificed a knight to break down Li’s center, but Li was able to activate his extra material and gain the upperhand tactically.
Annie Wang had Akshat Chandra on the ropes this round! Chandra developed an edge by advancing his d-pawn through the center, but he gave Wang an opportunity when he loosened his kingside with 29...g5. Wang was up to the challenge and seized the initiative, activating her pieces by gaining tempi on Chandra’s queen. Through tactical means, Wang won two pawns and entered a winning endgame. Chandra was able to fight back, though, by mobilizing his pieces and passed a-pawn. The players ended up drawing by three time repetition. 

Advait Patel had excellent chances to win for most of the game against Andrew Tang. In a Ruy Lopez, Patel gradually gained an edge due to his more active pieces, greater space, and superior pawn structure. Tang gave up an exchange to get rid of Patel’s passed b-pawn and well-placed bishop on the c6 outpost. A clean exchange ahead, Patel looked to be cruising to victory when he fell into “the only trick in the position,” according to GM Hess. Because of tactical threats against his king, he had to give back the exchange. Though Patel still had an extra pawn, his king was too loose, and the players soon drew. 

Praveen Balakrishnan vs. Mika Brattain was the longest game of the round. In the opening, the players traded into a queenless middlegame. Although each player had a pawn edge at different points, the position was very level throughout. They fought for 93 moves. Balakrishnan especially hoped to win as the last player able to tie with Liang for the tournament lead. Ultimately, neither was able to convert. 

Heading into the penultimate round, Awonder Liang leads with Akshat Chandra, Advait Patel, and Praveen Balakrishnan chasing him, half a point behind. Will we have a repeat U.S. Junior Champion?

U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship
In Sophie Morris-Suzuki vs. Jennifer Yu, both players played aggressively from the start. In tune with the King’s Indian Defense style position, Yu advanced on the kingside early in the game with ...f5. Morris-Suzuki countered by pushing pawns to both f4 and g4 and then sacrificing an exchange for a pawn. Yu defended well, and, after Morris-Suzuki’s attack was tamed, Yu activated her pieces and began her own king hunt. Yu chased Morris-Suzuki’s king to f3 before trading into a piece up endgame. 

Martha Samadashvili vs. Carissa Yip began as a calm Italian game until Samadashvili tossed out an aggressive g4 pawn thrust on the kingside. Her aggressive play, however, ended up weakening her position, and Yip asserted pressure in the center to win an exchange. After a complex struggle, Yip converted her material edge into a win. 
A French Tarrasch turned into a wild king run in Maggie Feng vs. Emily Nguyen. On move 14, Nguyen chose the brave yet accurate Ke3! to get her king out of check in the opening. Despite Nguyen’s centralized king with many pieces still on the board, Nguyen had an advantageous position because of her hold on the center and kingside. Feng sacrificed a pawn to open up the position, yet Nguyen maintained her edge into the endgame, eventually promoting a pawn. 

In a slightly worse position, Rochelle Wu blundered the exchange against Nastassja Matus, and Matus had no trouble converting her material lead into a win. 
In the Nimzo Indian Defense, Thalia Cervantes gained an advantage against Sanjana Vittal by weakening her pawn structure to gain an outpost on c5. Cervantes further exerted pressure by doubling rooks to aim at Vittal’s isolated h-pawn, tying down many of Vittal’s pieces. Cervantes eventually gained a winning advantage when she broke through with her king in the endgame.

Heading into round 8, Carissa Yip still leads with Jennifer Yu and Emily Nguyen trailing by half a point. Yip will have to prove herself against two of her greatest rivals over the next two rounds.  She plays Maggie Feng tomorrow and then faces Jennifer Yu in the final round. 

Photos courtesy of Saint Louis Chess Club, Austin Fuller. 


Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions

The Saint Louis Chess Club acknowledges Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, whose generous support makes our tournaments possible.

The STLCC and WCHOF admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved.

Watch the games of the U.S. Junior Championship and U.S. Girls Championship with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2018-07-19

U.S. Junior Championships - Round 6 Recap



by Vanessa West

In a thrilling round 6, the leaders of both championships lost their games, opening up the race for 1st completely. The Junior section currently has a 6-way tie at the top while Carissa Yip’s lead has been reduced to just half a point in the Girls’ section.

Read the full recap >
U.S. Junior Championship

The game of the day was Akshat Chandra’s victory over tournament leader, Advait Patel. Chandra essayed a kingside pawn storm in a King’s Indian Defense, doubling his queen and rook on the h-file to exert pressure. On move 34, Chandra found an elegant shot, Nxd6!, breaking through in the center, and soon checkmated. This victory gave Chandra a share in the colossal tie for 1st.
Alex Bian vs. Mika Brattain featured a double-edged kings-castled-on-opposite-sides middlegame. In the midst of complications, the two players obtained an imbalance of a rook vs. a bishop and two pawns. Initially, Brattain’s bishop and pawns had the advantage. However, in the ending, Bian was able to utilize his rooks and create a dangerous passed d-pawn, leading to a breakthrough and victory.

In a Classical French Defense, Praveen Balakrishnan outplayed Annie Wang, leaving her with a cramped position and blocked light-squared bishop. In the endgame, Balakrishnan gradually nursed these advantages into a winning two pawn advantage.
Andrew Tang vs. John Burke was an even battle for a long time until Tang blundered a piece on move 41, just after making time control.

Ruifeng Li vs. Awonder Liang was a very even game in the Caro-Kann throughout, ending in a 57 move draw. 

The finish of this round leaves six(!) players tied for 1st—Awonder Liang, John Burke, Akshat Chandra, Advait Patel, Praveen Balakrishnan, and Alex Bian. There are three games left, and it is nearly anyone’s tournament!

U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship
The game of the day was Sophie Morris-Suzuki’s upset victory over Carissa Yip. It is not everyday that you see the player at the bottom of the scoreboard defeat the person at the top! 

On move 33, Morris-Suzuki found a key tactic, striking in the center of the board with ...Rxd4!   Although Morris-Suzuki gave Yip some chances to get back into the game in the resulting time scramble, after time control, Morris-Suzuki’s pieces took over the board, and she soon won material and the game.

After the round, Morris-Suzuki mentioned the inspiring new perspective she gained over the rest day: “I decided that every game is basically a new tournament.”
Jennifer Yu also bounced back today with a dazzling attacking victory over Nastassja Matus. Matus ran her king into the center when Yu broke through on the kingside, but this wasn’t enough for her king to escape alive. Yu cracked through in the center with 28. Rxe6+!, and it was all over. 

Rochelle Wu’s victory vs. Thalia Cervantes featured 18 moves of opening preparation before the youngest player in the tournament had to think of her own move. With extra space and more active pieces, Wu had a significant positional advantage. She converted these into an attack against Cervantes’ open king, gaining a huge amount of material in the process. 

Emily Nguyen gained a critical opening advantage when she achieved an octopus knight on d3, taking away Sanjana Vittal’s ability to castle and winning a pawn. Nguyen gradually pressed her advantage in material and activity to victory. 
The only draw of the round was Maggie Feng vs. Martha Samadashvili, which was a fairly level conflict from start to finish. 

Carissa Yip still leads, but Maggie Feng, Jennifer Yu, and Emily Nguyen are close behind with 4 points. 

Photos courtesy of Saint Louis Chess Club, Austin Fuller. 


Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions

The Saint Louis Chess Club acknowledges Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, whose generous support makes our tournaments possible.

The STLCC and WCHOF admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved.

Watch the games of the U.S. Junior Championship and U.S. Girls Championship with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2018-07-18

VIII IBCA World Team Chess Championship 2018




The VIII IBCA World Team Chess Championship for Blind and Visually Impaired is held between 20 and 31 July, 2018 in Hotel “MARINELA” Sofia, Republic of Bulgaria
The organizers are the International Braille Chess Association (IBCA) and the Bulgarian Federation “Sports for Visually Impaired”. The international website for live streaming of chess events with computer analysis - ChessBomb is media partner of the event.

PARTICIPANTS AND GAME SYSTEM
The top 16 teams in the last IBCA Olympics held in Macedonia can participate. Cancellations  will  be  covered  according  to  the  strict  classification  order  and each group will keep always the classification order obtained in the Olympics.
The  competition  will  be  developed  with  the  following  system:  2  groups consisting of 8 teams each one will be formed in the previous phase and they will contest a league composed of 7 rounds.
In each game the winning team will get 2 points, in case of a tie 1 point and the loss 0 points. In case of a tie at the end of this phase between two or more teams, the tiebreak will be the sum
of all real points obtained in each board.
At the end of this previous phase, the top 2 of each group will play the semifinal, crossing agains
t the top 2 of the other group. The winners of these semifinals will  contest  the  final.  The  losers  of  these  semifinals  will  play  for  the  next positions.
In semifinal and final matches, the tiebreak system will be decided by boards (result  of  the  first  board,  the  second,  etc.).  In  case  of  a  tie  on  4  boards,  the highest ranked team at the last Olympics will be the winner.
The time control will be 90 minutes per player plus 30 seconds increment per move, until the end of the game.

The Competition plan is a s follows:
PREVIOUS PHASE
GROUP A                                              GROUP B
1.RUSSIA                                              2.UKRAINE
4.SERBIA                                              3.POLAND
5.GERMANY                                        6.SPAIN
8.AZARBAIJAN                                   7.INDIA
9.VENEZUELA                                    10. LITHUANIA
12. ITALY                                              11. BULGARIA
13. GREAT BRITAIN                           14. MACEDONIA
16. SLOVENIA                                      15.ROMANIA

SEMIFINALS (DRAW FOR COLORS)
1 MATCH           1º GROUP A  -------- 2º GROUP B
2 MATCH           2º GROUP A  -------- 1º GROUP B
3 MATCH           3º GROUP A  -------- 4º GROUP B
4 MATCH           4º GROUP A  -------- 3º GROUP B
5 MATCH           5º GROUP A  -------- 6º GROUP B
6 MATCH           6º GROUP A  -------- 5º GROUP B
7 MATCH           7º GROUP A  -------- 8º GROUP B
8 MATCH           8º GROUP A  -------- 7º GROUP B

FINAL (DRAW FOR COLORS)
WINNER MATCH 1 --- WINNER MATCH 2 (FOR CHAMPION AND SUB CHAMPION)
LOSER  MATCH 1 ---- LOSER MATCH 2 (FOR 3 AND 4 POSITION)

WINNER MATCH 3 ---- WINNER MATCH 4 (FOR 5 AND 6 POSITION)
LOSER MATCH 3 ----- LOSER MATCH 4 (FOR 7 AND 8 POSITION)

WINNER MATCH 5 ----- WINNER MATCH 6 (FOR 9 AND 10 POSITION)
LOSER MATCH 5 -------- LOSER MATCH 6 (FOR 11 AND 12 POSITION)

WINNER MATCH 7 ----- WINNER MATCH 8 (FOR 13 AND 14 POSITION)
LOSER MATCH 7 ------ LOSER MATCH 8 (FOR 15 AND 16 POSITION)

BULLETIN
A daily bull etin would be issued with the previous day's games. Bulletins will be handed over to each team in print or electronic format on request. This information will also be available online.

PRIZES
Teams placed first, second and third will be awarded respectively with gold, silver
and bronze medals and cups. The prizes will be awarded at the official closing ceremony.

PROGRAMME
JULY 21, 22 , 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 - Rounds 1 to 7 every day at 13.00 (CET)
JULY 28 rest day
JULY 29 Semifinal matches at 13.00
JULY 30 Final match at 07.00


Watch the games of the VIII IBCA World Team Chess Championship 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.


Argentinian Championship 2018

The Argentinian Championship is a 14-player round-robin tournament taking place from 17-30 July 2018 in Laprida, Argentina. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one.

Round 1  Jul 17, 2018 20:00 
Round 2  Jul 18, 2018 20:00 
Round 3  Jul 19, 2018 21:00 
Round 4  Jul 20, 2018 21:00 
Round 5  Jul 22, 2018 20:00 
Round 6  Jul 23, 2018 20:00 
Round 7  Jul 24, 2018 20:00 
Round 8  Jul 25, 2018 20:00 
Round 9  Jul 26, 2018 20:00 
Round 10 Jul 27, 2018 20:00 
Round 11 Jul 28, 2018 13:30 
Round 12 Jul 29, 2018 20:00 
Round 13 Jul 30, 2018 19:00

Watch the games of the Argentinian Championship 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

11th Paleochora Open 2018

The 11th Paleochora International is a 9-round Swiss open tournament taking place in Paleochora, Crete, between 18 and 25 July 2018.
The players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, then 30 minutes for the rest of the game plus 30 seconds per move starting from move 1.
This year's edition attracted 201 participants, 42 among them are titled chess players, including 20 gross masters. The first players in the start rating list are Pashikian Arman (2603) Banikas Hristos (2591), Istratescu Andrei (2575), Fier Alexandr (2570), GM Kharitonov Alexandr (2564), Hracek Zbynek (2563), Nikolov Momchil (2551).

Official site

Schedule: UTC

Round 1    Jul 18, 2018    14:30 
Round 2    Jul 19, 2018    07:00 
Round 3    Jul 19, 2018    14:30 
Round 4    Jul 20, 2018    14:30 
Round 5    Jul 21, 2018    14:30 
Round 6    Jul 22, 2018    14:30 
Round 7    Jul 23, 2018    14:30 
Round 8    Jul 24, 2018    14:30 
Round 9    Jul 25, 2018    07:00

Watch the games of the 11th Paleochora Open 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

You can see games from previous issues of the tournament with computer analysis at ChessBomb:
10th Paleochora Open 2017 (blogpost)
9th Paleochora Open 2016 (Winner Stelios Halkias)


2018-07-17

U.S. Junior Championships - Round 5 Recap


by Vanessa West

In the Junior section, defending champion Awonder Liang won a key game to gain ground on Advait Patel. Contrastingly, in the Girls’ section, Carissa Yip extended her lead to a full point.

Read the full recap >
U.S. Junior Championship

The game of the day was Mika Brattain vs. Awonder Liang. Both players came to the board ready to play fighting chess for the win. Liang played the very dynamic Grunfeld Defense, and Brattain followed suit when he sacrificed a knight to open up Liang’s kingside. Brattain was able to create enough pressure that Liang dashed his king into center to evade the attack. However, after a trade of rooks and then queens, Brattain’s king attack petered out, and Liang won the ending with his extra piece. This victory allowed Liang to gain half a point on the tournament leader, Advait Patel, who drew his game.
Initially, Patel had good attacking chances against Praveen Balakrishnan when Balakrishnan delayed castling in the Taimanov Sicilian. After a few slow moves by Patel, Balakrishnan was able to equalize by finishing development and castling. The players soon traded down to a rook ending and agreed to a draw. Over the last 5 rounds, Balakrishnan has proven himself to be a formidable competitor. Against four grandmasters and the tournament leader, he’s emerged with an undefeated +1 score and a 2650+ US Chess performance rating.
In Annie Wang vs. Alex Bian, Bian obtained the bishop pair while Wang achieved a potent knight on the d5 outpost. Bian sacrificed a pawn to take command of the dark squares, soon winning the exchange. He then carefully converted the rook vs. bishop ending into a victory.

The grandmaster duel of John Burke vs. Akshat Chandra was a 30 move draw in the Scotch game. These two players are tied for third, trailing Patel by a full point along with Balakrishnan. Though there are still four rounds left, with each game that passes, their chances to catch up dwindle.

Andrew Tang vs. Ruifeng Li was an 86 move struggle for the upperhand. Though Li gained an extra pawn, it wasn’t quite enough for the win in the notoriously drawish rook and opposite color bishop ending that arose.

Heading into the rest day, Patel leads with 4 out of 5, and Liang is close on his tail with 3.5 points.

U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship
Carissa Yip essayed the King’s Indian Defense against Nastassja Matus, showing aggressive intentions from the start. After a double-edged middlegame, the players traded queens, and Yip’s bishop pair came to life. Under pressure, Matus made a tactical error, allowing Yip to win material and conduct a mating attack. This victory guaranteed that Yip maintain her lead at the halfway mark. With 4.5 out of 5, Yip has achieved a US Chess performance rating of 2600+, far beyond her rating entering the championship.
The most dramatic game of the round was Thalia Cervantes vs. Jennifer Yu. In an incredibly hard-fought battle, the advantage switched hands several times. First, Yu won a pawn. Cervantes gained a king attack by penetrating into Yu’s position with her queen and rook. Yu gradually defended and utilized her extra pawn, even winning a second one. As the players reached mutual time trouble, the game was likely to end in a perpetual check when Yu made a heartbreaking blunder, allowing a checkmate in three moves. Yu’s loss increases Yips lead over the field to a full point with only Maggie Feng trailing with 3.5.

In Sanjana Vittal vs. Maggie Feng, the players traded queens fairly early in the French Winawer. Yet, another octopus knight was achieved, this time by Vittal, who was pressing a slight advantage in the ending. However, Feng managed to breakthrough on the kingside with her king and rooks, gaining strong connected passers on the e- and f-files that eventually decided the game.

Martha Samadashvili won her second game in a row. After many moves of a balanced struggle in the Sicilian, Samadashvili gained one pawn then a second against Sophie Morris-Suzuki. Samadashvili finished the game with a fork tactic to end up ahead a full knight.
Emily Nguyen vs. Rochelle Wu was a close game throughout. Nguyen gained an extra pawn, but the resulting rook and opposite color bishop ending didn’t offer too many winning chances, and it didn’t take long for the players to agree to a draw. 

Tomorrow is the rest day and the Saint Louis Chess Club’s 10 year anniversary celebration! The championship continues on Thursday. Will Patel and Yip coast to victory or will their rivals make them sweat?
Watch all the action LIVE at
USChessChamps.com

Photos courtesy of Saint Louis Chess Club, Austin Fuller. 


Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions

The Saint Louis Chess Club acknowledges Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, whose generous support makes our tournaments possible.

The STLCC and WCHOF admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved.

Watch the games of the U.S. Junior Championship and U.S. Girls Championship with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.