2018-04-20

Khanzad Classic Chess Championship 2018

The 10th Khanzad Classic Chess Championship 2018  is organized by Dlzar Hama Salih Qader Iraq Federation (IRQ) in Erbilq Iraq from March 22nd to 24th of April 2018.

Time control: 90 Minutes With 30 Secends increment from Move 1

Official site

Schedule:

Round 2                   2018/03/22                   17:15
Round 3                   2018/03/23                   10:15
Round 4                   2018/03/23                   17:15
Round 5                   2018/03/24                   10:15
Round 6                   2018/04/24                   17:15
Round 7                   2018/04/24                   10:15
Round 8                   2018/04/24                   17:15
Round 9                   2018/04/24                   10:15



Watch the games of the Khanzad Classic Chess Championship 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.




Kazakhstan Championships 2018


The 2018 Kazakhstan Championships  are taking place from 20-30 April in Almaty. The tournaments are organised by the Kazakhstan Chess Federation and the Shakhmardan Yessenov Foundation.

The Kazakhstan Championship 2018  is a 12-player single round-robin.  The winner not only becomes the Kazakhstan Champion but also gains the right to play in the Asian Individual Championship and on the Kazakhstan team. The time control is 90 minutes for 40 moves, then 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment from move 1.

The 2018 Kazakhstan Women's Championship is a 10-player round robin tournament which features the country's best female players. The time control is 90 minutes for 40 moves, then 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment from move 1.

Official site

Schedule of the both tournaments: (UTC)

Round 1      Apr 20, 2018    09:00 
Round 2      Apr 21, 2018    09:00 
Round 3      Apr 22, 2018    09:00 
Round 4      Apr 23, 2018    09:00 
Round 5      Apr 24, 2018    09:00 
Round 6      Apr 25, 2018    09:00 
Round 7      Apr 26, 2018    09:00 
Round 8      Apr 27, 2018    09:00 
Round 9      Apr 28, 2018    09:00 
Round 10    Apr 29, 2018    09:00 
Round 11    Apr 30, 2018    09:00   


Watch the games of the Kazakhstan Championship 2018  and 2018 Kazakhstan Women's Championship with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.


2018 U.S. Championships - Round 2 Recap


The second round of the 2018 U.S. Championships was as promising as the first. With plenty of exciting matches on the horizon, the chess fans gathered to see the players at work; they weren’t disappointed, as we once again got a combative round in the books.

U.S. Championship

So vs Onischuk 

This game perfectly portrayed the difference we often see between an incredibly strong grandmaster, Onischuk, and an elite player like So. White chose to open with 1.e4 and the players soon entered a common line of the Ruy Lopez. 

Read the full recap here >
Unfortunately for Onischuk, his plan with Nd7-Nb6 backfired quickly when So perfectly aligned his pieces on the kingside, and accurately found the moment to break in the center and create the necessary havoc. Once the position was destabilized, white’s pieces were simply superior. So used his immaculate technique and pocketed the full point with ease. 

Akobian vs Liang 

An extremely important battle was the one between the experienced Akobian, and the up and coming prodigy, Awonder Liang. Akobian used his experience to stir the game into strategic territory, where he hoped it would be easier to outplay Liang. White quickly got his opponent under severe pressure, and could have ended the game much earlier if he would have found the killing blow 26.Nxd5! 
Unfortunately for him, he did not see it and had to wait for another tremendous blunder in time trouble to finish the game. With this victory, Akobian joins So at the top of the table.  

Nakamura vs Zherebukh 

Since joining the U.S. Championship roster last year, Zherebukh has proved time and time again that he deserves to be among the best. His last year’s victory against Caruana cemented his spot and showed that he is not afraid of anybody.
Playing the black pieces against Nakamura might be intimidating, but Zherebukh kept complete control from the get go and did not allow any chances for White. The game quickly ended in a draw, and Nakamura will need to start winning very soon if he wants to keep pace with the leaders.

Robson vs Izoria 

What started off as a tame Anti Berlin, soon regressed into a wild affair when Robson decided, in his usual combative style, to sacrifice a pawn with 22.f4! Izoria accepted the sacrifice but quickly found himself in trouble as he was unable to regroup his wandering knight back into his own base. Robson made swift use of his piece superiority and led a decisive attack against his opponent’s king. Robson is back in the mix, while Izoria will need to regroup in the upcoming rounds.

U.S. Women’s Championship 

Paikidze vs Gorti


A very complex battle ensued in this game. The opening was balanced, but it looked as if Paikidze might be slightly better due to her space advantage and her upcoming minority attack.
Unfortunately for her, she timed her break badly and quickly ended up in trouble when Gorti’s knight ventured into her camp. Gorti found the right sacrifice and looked on the verge of winning the game, but her technique failed her, and she had to settle to a draw in a rook’s endgame.

Krush vs Derakhshani 

This game was a heartbreak for the Championship newcomer, Derakhshani. Just like in round one, she played a great game up to a certain point, but once again failed to close the show and allowed her opponent back into the game. Krush’s experience played a pivotal role in the outcome of the game, as her nerves during the time trouble moments allowed her to complete change the position’s assessment, from losing to winning in a matter of 3 reckless moves. 
Derakhshani’s loss is surely disappointing, but her morale is certainly not shattered, as she promised to come back stronger in tomorrow’sgame against Paikidze. Krush is back on track, and ready to make another run for the national title!

Foisor vs Goletiani

The reigning champion played an impeccable strategic game all the way into the late middlegame, when she already amassed a decisive advantage. Unfortunately for her, Goletiani’s counter strike on the queenside shocked the champion as she completely lost the thread of the game in time trouble. The game took a wild turn when Foisor decided to sacrifice a piece and go all in into the attack. The champion underestimated her opponent’s defensive resources and after the time trouble she was completely losing if only Goletiani would have found 43…Ne6! Instead, Goletiani decided to call it a night and force the draw with a perpetual. A lucky escape for the champ!

Feng vs Sharevich 

After yesterday’s loss, Maggie Feng came to this game ready to bounce back at all costs. And she did so without much effort, as she completely neutralized her opponent’s pieces and took the full point home after a convincing performance. 
The result of the game was never in doubt, as she showed her class and did not let her opponent slip at any moment.

Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions


Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved


Watch the games of the U.S. Championship 2018  and U.S. Womens Championship 2018  with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

2018-04-19

2018 U.S. Championships - Round 1 Recap

The first day of the 2018 U.S. & U.S. Women’s Chess Championships kicked off with a plethora of exciting matchups that were surely going to bring the fire to the board, the commentary booth, and to all the fans across the world that chose to tune in. And it did not disappoint! 

Liang vs Caruana

In the open section the big clash of the round was the battle between the young prodigy, Awonder Liang, and the man of the hour, Fabiano Caruana. The world championship challenger chose to surprise his opponent as early as move one, when he chose not to employ his pet line, the Petroff. Instead, we got an unbalanced Sicilian as an early treat; nevertheless, Awonder chose the tame 3.Bb5 and forcefully stirred the game into more calm waters.

Read the full recap here >
His decision proved to be very practical, as he managed to neutralize Caruana’s attempts to destabilize the position. The game was drawn without many complications arising along the way. 

Nakamura vs Robson

The always fierce Nakamura chose a wild line of the Scotch gambit to try and rattle the precise Robson. Unfortunately for him, it all backfired after Robson accurately neutralized his attempt and even obtained a better position out of the opening. Nakamura sensed the looming danger and decided to simplify the position as quickly as possible before things could have turned dark for him. The game ended in a draw soon after the 30th move without many fireworks exploding on the board.

Zherebukh vs So

Wesley simply just proved his overwhelming class in this one. Zherebukh got a normal position after the opening, but in the ensuing maneuvering middlegame, So outplayed his opponent with ease. With each move, So’s pieces were improving, while his opponents were losing their position and poise. Zherebukh’s 26th move, Kh1, was a complete blunder as he allowed the tactical blow 26…Nc2! Which secured a utterly winning endgame for black and Wesley had no problems converting. Strong start for the defending champion!
Xiong vs Izoria 

Jeffery has had a pretty difficult 2017, but his first tournament of the year was quite a successful affair (winning the GM Invitational in Saint Louis). Coming off with a great attitude, and facing the newcomer Izoria, he was surely the favorite going into today’s round. His offbeat approach allowed him to slowly outpace his opponent, and by the 30th move he was already a clean pawn up. Unfortunately for him, his technique failed him in the endgame and allowed the Californian to save half a point after a tenacious defensive effort. Izoria will surely be happy with his inaugural game in the U.S. Championship, Jeffery will surely look to bounce back from his disappointment and pick back the pace in the upcoming rounds. 

US Women’s Championship 

Goletiani vs Zatonskih 


Quite an interesting game ensued between these two fighting ladies. Goletiani skillfully stirred the game into an unbalanced reversed color Benoni, and obtained a nice advantage early on. Zatonskih fought back and slowly but surely managed to outplay her lower rated opponent.
The 4 time U.S. Women’s Champion, Zatonskih, failed to find the killing blow (25…Bf6!!) which would have secured a decisive advantage after the ensuing complications. After that miss, Goletiani was able to get back into the game and successfully managed to save half a point. 

Gorti vs Krush 

A scintillating battle between the U.S. Girls' Junior champion, Akshita Gorti, and her much more experienced opponent, 7 time U.S. Women’s Champion Irina Krush. The young Gorti played a balanced game up until the 34th move when she blundered with Nd2, allowing for a beautiful tactic that should have ended the game for Krush. Fortunately for Gorti, Krush’s technique completely failed her as she allowed the young champion back into the game. In the end, it was Gorti’s tenacious defense that saved her from the claws of her experienced opponent. A great save for Gorti, and a disappointing miss for Krush.

Abrahamyan vs Foisor 

This was a wild affair between two of the favorites of the event. The reigning champion surprised Abrahamyan early on by choosing the Caro-Kann, an opening that has not been part of her usual repertoire in recent years. Abrahamyan chose an aggressive line, and Foisor’s inexperience showed early on, as she allowed white to get a powerful center coupled with a menacing space advantage. 
Foisor cleverly offered her opponent a poisoned pawn, which when accepted, opened a new wave of opportunities due to her active placed pieces and the control over the light squares. Despite her extra material, Abrahamyan did not manage to find a way to neutralize her opponent’s compensation, and in the end she had to allow Foisor’s perpetual check. A complex draw that allows both contenders to remain fairly satisfied after the first-round melee.

Wang vs Feng 

Quite an interesting battle between the two young contenders. Wang sacrificed a pawn for compensation early on, and slowly managed to construct a powerful initiative around her superior piece play. Feng was doing fine all the way until the endgame, but unfortunately for her, the rook endgame was simply too complex for her, as she allowed her opponents rooks to penetrate the 7th rank and create menacing threats against her king. The difference in piece activity proved to be decisive, as Wang scored an important win which propulses her to the top of the crosstable.

Derakhshani vs Sharevich
Derakhshani started her U.S. Championship quest with a powerfully prepared opening, allowing her to get an advantage as soon as move seven, after her opponent’s sacrificed surely backfired. Once again though, as it has happened in many games during this round, the player with extra material failed to prove their technique and allowed their opponents back into their game. After Sharevich managed to get her pawn back, the draw was easy to achieve. 

A combative way to start the US Championships for both sections, the upcoming rounds are going to be very interesting to watch!


Saint Louis Chess Club  |  Building Champions

The Saint Louis Chess Club acknowledges Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, whose generous support makes our tournaments possible.

The STLCC and WCHOF admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Copyright © 2018 Saint Louis Chess Campus, All rights reserved.


Watch the games of the U.S. Championship 2018  and U.S. Womens Championship 2018  with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

Sharjah Masters 2018. 8th Round Report

After a commanding position, Maghsoodloo Parham of Iran conceded a draw for the first time in the tournament to Safarli Eltaj of Azerbaijan but maintained his one point lead with 7.5 points at the end of the eighth and penultimate round of the Sharjah Masters International Chess Tournament, organised by Sharjah Culture & Chess Club at its ultra modern venue. Safarli who extricated half a point from Maghsoodloo and the top seed Wang Hao of China are on the second spot with 6.5 points each. 



Maghsoodloo starting with Reti opening, managed to grab a pawn on the 33rd move, after a series of exchanges with Safarli. But he mismanaged his bishop in an almost winning position and had to be content with a draw in 71 moves.

Wang Hao forced the queen exchange on the 23rd move against SP Sethuraman of India in the English opening. Thereafter Wang held an upper hand with his double bishop advantage against a bishop and a knight in the end game.



 Sethu lost a valuable pawn on 37th move and Wang sacrificed his bishop to get his b- pawn promoted to a queen. Sethu fought for a few more moves, but surrendered when Wang began to mop the pawns one by one. 

 The queens of Kryvoruchko Yuiry of Ukraine and Vishnu Prasanna of India were off the board by 25th move of the Ruy Lopez opening, employed by the former. Though Vishnu had a rook and bishop to that of rook and knight of his opponent, Kryvoruchkov’s powerful outside passer pawn could not be stopped, forcing Vishnu to resign after 56 moves. 



 Naiditsch Arkadij of Azerbaijan played patiently to wat for his opponent IM DImakling Oliver of Philippines to commit a mistake in a Scotch game. When Dimakling buckled under pressure, Arkadij seized the opportunity to strike and post a win.



 Gawain Jones of England lost his second successive game, this time to Mareco Sandro of Argentina in a Kings Indian defence. He could not handle the opponent’s connected pawn structures on both flanks and paid penalty for it in 85 moves. 

In a queen and equal pawns ending arising out of Kings Indian defence, Adly Ahmed of Egypt had a passer pawn, which paved the way for victory to him against Kovalev Vladislav of Russia in 43 moves.


In the encounter between the Indian grandmaster B Adhiban and Eljanov Pavel Ukraine,the Berlin defence couldnot be cracked and both settled for a draw on the 25th turn by repeating their moves. 

The symmetrical English opening between Tabatabaei Amin of Iran and the currently the youngest grandmaster in the world Abdusattorov Nodirbek ended in a tame draw with just two kings left on the board after 46 moves. 

Important Results of 8th Round



GM
Maghsoodloo Parham
2615
IRI
7
½  - ½
6
GM
Safarli Eltaj
2653
AZE
GM
Wang Hao
2707
CHN
1  - 0
6
GM
Sethuraman S.P.
2631
IND
GM
Inarkiev Ernesto
2680
RUS
½  - ½
GM
Artemiev Vladislav
2701
RUS
GM
Adhiban B.
2661
IND
½  - ½
GM
Eljanov Pavel
2700
UKR
GM
Kryvoruchko Yuriy
2703
UKR
5
1  - 0
5
GM
Vishnu Prasanna. V
2510
IND
GM
Naiditsch Arkadij
2701
AZE
5
1  - 0
5
IM
Dimakiling Oliver
2412
PHI
GM
Mareco Sandro
2645
ARG
5
1  - 0
5
GM
Jones Gawain C B
2675
ENG
GM
Grandelius Nils
2652
SWE
5
½  - ½
5
GM
Jumabayev Rinat
2612
KAZ
GM
Adly Ahmed
2626
EGY
5
1  - 0
5
GM
Kovalev Vladislav
2648
BLR
IM
Tabatabaei M.Amin
2605
IRI
5
½  - ½
GM
Abdusattorov Nodirbek
2540
UZB
GM
Rakhmanov Aleksandr
2652
RUS
½  - ½
IM
Iniyan P
2466
IND
GM
Iturrizaga Bonelli Eduardo
2624
VEN
1  - 0
GM
Sundararajan Kidambi
2436
IND
GM
Petrosian Tigran L.
2609
ARM
½  - ½
IM
Vignesh N R
2475
IND
IM
Firouzja Alireza
2572
IRI
1  - 0

Bhambure Shantanu
2155
IND
GM
Darini Pouria
2478
IRI
½  - ½
GM
Narayanan.S.L
2568
IND
GM
Petrosyan Manuel
2560
ARM
1  - 0
CM
Bharath Subramaniyam H
1997
IND
IM
Sindarov Javokhir
2431
UZB
½  - ½
FM
Erigaisi Arjun
2481
IND



Watch the games of the Sharjah Masters 2018 with computer analysis LIVE on ChessBomb.

*the information is provided from the Sharjahchess